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Haulier Handbook
Guidance for haulage companies and commercial drivers moving goods between Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales) and the European Union.

Haulier Handbook

 

Contents

 

  • Introduction
  • Stay up-to-date
  • Drivers: documents, licences and permits
  • UK hauliers: documents, licences and permits
  • EU hauliers: documents, licences and permits
  • Cross-border responsibilities when moving goods
  • Safety and Security
  • Moving goods from GB to the EU
  • Moving goods from the EU to GB
  • Securing a vehicle when travelling to and from the UK
  • Checklist of customs documents

 Introduction

 

This guidance is for hauliers and commercial drivers who move goods between Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales) and the European Union (EU). It tells you what you will need to do from 1 January 2021.

It explains:

  • what documents you will need
  • how to follow new rules to manage traffic heading to ports
  • new border control processes

There will be separate guidance on moving goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

We will add a PDF version of this guidance to this page in the next week. We will also add foreign language versions.


Stay up-to-date

 

Some of the rules are still being agreed between the UK and the EU. This guidance will be updated with the latest information as soon as it is available.

Visit an advice site at a motorway services or truckstop for in-person advice.


Drivers: documents, licences and permits

 

Driver Certificate of Professional Competence

 

All UK drivers will still need a Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC) in order to work. Drivers need to carry their Driver CPC qualification card while driving in the EU.

 

Drivers working for UK operators

 

Drivers with a current UK Driver CPC working for UK operators do not need to take any additional action regarding qualifications to prepare for 1 January 2021. A UK Driver CPC will continue to be valid for drivers of all journeys that UK operators are entitled to undertake, whether as a result of an agreement with the EU or on the basis of ECMT permits.

UK legislation currently allows EU drivers working for UK operators to continue doing so with a Driver CPC awarded by EU member states. If such drivers wish to have long-term certainty on their ability to work for UK operators, they should exchange their EU Driver CPC for a UK Driver CPC.

 

UK drivers working for EU operators

 

Drivers holding a UK Driver CPC who work for, or plan to work for an EU company (e.g. a UK driver working for a French or Irish operator) should take action. This is because a UK Driver CPC may not be recognised as a valid qualification by EU employers from 1 January 2021.

Drivers who hold a UK Driver CPC working or wanting to work for EU businesses should exchange their UK Driver CPC for an EU Driver CPC before 1 January 2021. Apply to the relevant body in an EU or European Economic Area (EEA) country to exchange a UK Driver CPC.

 

Driving licences and International Driving Permits

 

Drivers will continue to need the correct category of driving licence for the vehicle they are driving. Drivers can check the driving categories on their licence.

Drivers may need an International Driving Permit (IDP) in addition to their UK driving licence to drive in some EU and EEA countries.

IDPs can be purchased over the counter at many UK Post Office branches. An IDP costs £5.50.

 

Visas, passports and identity cards

 

UK drivers may need immigration permissions to undertake an international journey to the EU. Further details will be issued subject to the outcome of UK-EU negotiations.

When the rules are confirmed, information about how to get a visa if you need one will be on each country’s travel advice page.

UK drivers will need at least 6 months on a UK passport to travel to the EU from 1 January 2021. Drivers can check if they need to renew their passport.

Before 1 October 2021, EUEEA and Swiss nationals can enter the UK with a passport or national identity card, as they do now.

From 1 October 2021, EUEEA and Swiss nationals will need a passport to travel to the UK.

This will not apply to EUEEA and Swiss nationals whose rights are protected by the withdrawal agreements, including those covered by the EU Settlement Scheme and frontier workers. They will still be able to use national identity cards for travel until 31 December 2025 at least.


UK hauliers: documents, licences and permits

 

Operator licensing: Community Licence and the UK Licence for the Community

 

UK hauliers undertaking international work will continue to need the relevant operator licence.

Hauliers with a Community Licence will be automatically issued with a replacement ‘UK Licence for the Community’ for use from 1 January 2021. A copy of the new UK Licence for the Community should, in all circumstances, be carried on board all vehicles when working in the EU from 1 January 2021.

Possession of a UK Licence for the Community will not necessarily guarantee the right for UK hauliers to do business to, from and within the EU. This will depend on the outcome of UK-EU negotiations. This guidance will be updated as soon as the new rules are agreed.

 

ECMT permits

 

UK hauliers travelling to or through the EU may require a European Conference of Ministers of Transport (ECMT) permit for some journeys from 1 January 2021. The journeys for which ECMT permits are required will depend on the outcome of UK-EU negotiations. This guidance will be updated as soon as the new rules are agreed.

UK hauliers who may require ECMT permits for international work in 2021 should prepare to apply for them. Find out about the ECMT application process.

 

Motor insurance Green Card

 

A Green Card is an international certificate of motor insurance. It is accepted in the 48 countries that are part of the Green Card scheme. UK drivers are likely to need a Green Card to drive their vehicles in the EU (including the Republic of Ireland) from 1 January 2021.

UK drivers and operators should take action to ensure that they have Green Cards for all vehicles and trailers that may be operated in the EU from 1 January 2021. Get Green Cards from the insurance company insuring the vehicle or trailer.

 

GB sticker

 

Drivers will need to display a GB sticker, fixed to the rear of the vehicle and trailer, even if the number plates include the GB identifier under the EU logo.

Vehicles registered in Great Britain or Northern Ireland don’t need to display a GB sticker to drive in Ireland.

 

Transport Manager Certificate of Professional Competence

 

Transport managers working for UK operators

 

Transport managers holding a UK Transport Manager CPC working for UK operators do not need to take any additional action regarding qualifications to prepare for 1 January 2021. The UK CPC will continue to be valid for transport managers working for UK operators.

 

Transport managers working for EU operators

 

UK Transport Manager CPC will no longer be recognised by EU operators from 1 January 2021.


EU hauliers: documents, licences and permits

 

Community Licence

 

EU operators must be licensed by their own country of establishment and carry a copy of a Community Licence at all times. Arrangements for operating in the UK from 1 January 2021 are subject to ongoing negotiations. This handbook will be updated on this point at the earliest possible opportunity

 

Cabotage

 

EU operators can currently continue to carry out cabotage in the UK. This matter is also subject to the outcome of UK-EU negotiations. This handbook will be updated on this point at the earliest possible opportunity.

 

Driver and vehicle documentation

 

EU operators doing business to, from or through the UK will need to carry proof of motor insurance for their vehicle and trailer. A Green Card or other proof of motor insurance will be recognised in the UK.


Cross-border responsibilities when moving goods

 

Trader

 

It is the trader’s responsibility to make customs declarations and provide the haulage company and driver with the correct documents. This can be done directly or via a third party, for example a freight forwarder, logistics company or customs agent.

 

Haulage company

 

The haulage company must ensure their driver has all the necessary customs information and documents and other paperwork.

 

The haulage company must also make sure that their drivers know what documents to present at each stage of the journey, including:

  • on road pre-departure inspections - checks to demonstrate border readiness
  • at ports or train terminals
  • at customs posts

 

Driver

 

The driver must carry the information and documentation provided by the haulage company in the vehicle for the duration of the journey. This also includes information and documentation necessary to meet EU member state requirements. This is because each movement of goods from the EU to the UK is both an export movement for EU authorities and import movement for UK authorities.

It is vital that drivers know what information and documentation is needed, and where, when and how they will be presented and checked.


Safety and Security

 

Safety and Security (S&S) declarations are a part of the overall customs process. Entry summary (ENS) and pre-departure declarations are made before goods arrive and leave a customs territory. Information from the declarations is used to risk assess goods for safety and security threats.

From 1 January 2021, S&S declarations will be due on imports to, and exports from GB. However, to allow for the adverse impacts of coronavirus (COVID-19) on businesses’ preparations for the new customs requirements, S&S import declarations on goods from the EU to Great Britain will be waived for 6 months, up to 30 June 2021. Northern Ireland will remain aligned with EU regulations under the NI Protocol.


Moving goods from GB to the EU

 

There are 4 ways in which goods move across the border:

  • Pre-notification
  • Common Transit Convention (CTC)
  • Admission Temporaire/Temporary Admission (ATA)
  • Transports Internationaux Routiers (TIR)

 

Safety and security exit declarations

 

For all of the export models listed above, a S&S exit declaration will be required from 1 January 2021.

The requirement for S&S information on export can usually be done via the customs export declaration, which contains information to meet S&S requirements. Where an export declaration is not submitted before departure, a standalone exit summary declaration (EXS) may be needed.

 

A standalone EXS declaration will be required if:

  • an empty container is being moved under a transport contract (a transport contract, or contract of carriage, is an agreement between a carrier and shipper or passenger, setting out each party’s duties and rights)
  • the goods have remained in temporary storage for more than 14 days
  • the goods have remained in temporary storage for less than 14 days but the import S&S declaration details are unknown or where the destination or consignee details change
  • the goods are moved under transit using a Transit Accompanying Document (TAD) or Transit and Safety and Security Declaration (TSADs) – TSADs cannot be used to meet S&S requirements in GB from 1 January 2021

 

A standalone EXS declaration will not be required if empty pallets and containers are moved out of GB not under a transport contract.

For joint S&S exit declarations and customs export declarations, and for standalone S&S exit declarations, the submission can be made on CHIEF/Customs Declaration Service. There will still be the option to submit declarations through community system provider (CSP) systems or third-party software providers.

In addition, relevant S&S requirements (entry summary declaration) must also be met for the country the goods are being moved to.

 

Check an HGV is ready to cross the border

 

The ‘Check an HGV is ready to cross the border’ service should be used before a haulier departs for the port. The service will check if the procedures required by the EU member states have been carried out. It will also confirm whether the driver has the documents they need for the goods they are carrying to enter the EU.

Using Check an HGV to get a Kent Access Permit will be a legal requirement for all HGVs using the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel.

 

Drivers can be fined £300 if they:

  • do not use the service when using the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel
  • provide a fraudulent declaration

 

Kent County Council will issue Local Haulier Permits (LHP) to hauliers in East Kent that hold a ‘Standard International’ O License. HGV drivers with a LHP will be able to use local roads, rather than join the Operation Brock queues. HGV drivers with a LHP will still need to use the Check an HGV service to get a Kent Access Permit if they are travelling to the EU via the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel.

The Kent Access Permit will be valid for a 24-hour period. When completing the Check an HGV service, the driver – or whoever is filling it in on their behalf – will be able to select the date and time at which they would like the Kent Access Permit to start.

 

Moving goods into the EU under the pre-notification procedure (at locations without customs control systems)

 

The pre-notification procedure applies at locations without customs control systems.

 

Before leaving GB: customs documents and procedures

 

When collecting goods to move into the EU, the driver must be given all customs documents necessary to cross into the EU. See the document checklist at the end of this handbook.

The GB exporter must complete the UK export procedures comprising, at minimum, a combined customs and S&S declaration. The driver will need to be told if the goods need to be presented to a UK customs office. Once this has been done, the exporter will be given permission to progress (P2P).

Once the exporter has permission to progress (P2P), having competed any additional documentary checks requested by the National Clearance Hub, the driver can collect and take the goods to the GB port or terminal of departure.

If the exporter is told that the goods must undergo a physical check, the driver can collect the goods and take them to a designated export place (DEP) or to an approved inland location for appropriate checks. Only after P2P is granted following completion of those checks can the driver take the goods to the GB port or terminal of departure.

It is the responsibility of the exporter to inform the haulage company about the P2P situation that applies to a given transport job at a given point in time.

The driver will need to carry evidence that a UK combined customs and S&S declaration has been made and they will be required to carry EU import documentation as well as other documents as detailed elsewhere in this handbook.

 

Documents for the EU border authorities

 

The driver must have all necessary reference numbers or documents to meet the import requirements of the country they are entering in the EU (see the document checklist at the end of this handbook). It is the responsibility of the GB exporter (with their customs agent and/or logistics provider) to ensure this is done.

 

The trader who exports the goods from GB must:

  • confirm with the trader who imports the goods into the EU that all necessary formalities and requirements have been met, e.g. submitting an import declaration
  • give full, clear instructions to the haulage company and driver so that they know what to do
  • provide all necessary documentation and information, e.g. the Movement Reference Number (MRN) for the EU import declaration, and hard copies of any licenses or certificates
  • from 1 January 2021, make sure the S&S exit declaration requirements have been met for the movement – relevant S&S requirements must also be met for the country the goods are being moved to
 
Entry summary declarations

 

For accompanied freight, the haulier is responsible for submitting the entry summary declaration – also known as the S&S declaration – into the member state’s Import Control System (ICS) at the first point of entry to the EU.

This is of particular importance at GB roll on roll off (RoRo) ports and terminals, especially those which do not have port inventory systems.

The deadline for lodging the entry summary declaration for goods moving by road is at least one hour before arrival.

 
Exit summary declarations

 

In most member states (especially those with borders with the UK), the exit summary declaration is combined with the export declaration.

 

At the EU border

 

The driver must follow the EU’s import and border requirements for the country they are entering. Further country specific information is set out below.

 

Moving goods through France

 

France has designed a smart border system for processing HGVs using ferry and Eurotunnel crossings. It pairs customs declaration data with the vehicle registration number transporting the consignment(s).

At check-in at ferry terminals or at the ‘pitstop’ at Eurotunnel, the driver will hand in the MRN. The MRN will be scanned and matched with the Vehicle Registration Number (VRN) or Trailer Registration Number (TRN).

For consignments from multiple traders, either the exporter or the driver can scan all the barcodes from the separate documents, using the Prodouanes app. This will create an MRN envelope. The driver will then only need to present one single MRN from the load they are carrying.

This data is analysed by the French customs system while the driver and consignment are on the ferry or train crossing the Channel. It allows HGVs to be pre-selected for further customs and/or sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) controls.

 

The driver will be informed en route if:

  • they can proceed
  • they need to declare for customs and/or SPS
  • there are any problems which need to be addressed before they can continue their journey
 
Safety and security declarations for France

 

Entry summary declarations must be done via the French ICS before crossing the EU border. This IT system operates in electronic data interchange (EDI) mode only. To do this the haulage or shipping company must use certified software (or web portals) which can interact with French Customs IT systems. Some ferry operators also provide this via their online web booking service.

 

Moving goods through the Netherlands

 

The Netherlands logistics industry has advice on how to pass through Dutch ports. This will help freight and logistics operators with the various formalities involved in UK-Dutch transportation of goods.

All customs declaration numbers for UK export and imports that travel through the Netherlands must be pre-registered via Portbase. This is a paid-for service.

Drivers will not be able to access Dutch terminals if they have not pre-registered via Portbase. The driver must present MRNs at UK check-in.

 
Safety and security declarations for the Netherlands

 

Entry summary declarations are submitted via the Portbase system at the time of booking the crossing. The transmission of the data is always completed by the carrier (i.e. the ferry operator) for both accompanied and unaccompanied freight.

 

Moving goods through Belgium

 

At Zeebrugge the RX/SeaPort digital system joins up the data submitted and required by all parties at the Port of Zeebrugge. The data is registered for imports and exports through their e-Desk. This can be done manually, through a linked data connection or through customs software.

Drivers will not be allowed to proceed to the Zeebrugge Terminal if customs declarations have not been pre-notified through the RX/SeaPort e-Desk.

RX/SeaPort has detailed information about importing and exporting through the Port of Zeebrugge.

At Antwerp the pre-notification of customs documents is done via the Port Community system of C-point. This pre-notification can be lodged by the exporter, the freight forwarder, customs agent or the haulage company.

C-point has detailed information about customs procedures at Antwerp.

 
Safety and security declarations for Belgium

 

Entry summary declarations should be submitted into the import clearance system via an EDI interface to the Customs Computer Paperless Customs and Excises (PLDA) system.

In Belgium the entry summary declaration submission is done by the ferry operator or shipping company for both accompanied and unaccompanied freight.

 

Moving goods through Spain

 

Ports in the South of Spain, such as Algeciras Port Authority, use the port community system Teleport 2.0.

The northern Spanish ports of Santander and Bilbao will soon use a similar port community system.

Those who register can trace their goods via the online e-service.

 

Hauliers going from GB to Spain should:

  • make or arrange to make the entry summary declaration (ENS) into the Spanish ICS
  • obtain the MRN
  • log into the carrier system and link the vehicle registration number to the MRN
  • the system checks the first 4 digits of the Integrated Tariff of the European Communities (TARIC) code, number of packages and weight

There is no equivalent ‘envelope’ system for groupage loads, so all consignments must be entered individually. The HGV cannot proceed to GB check-in unless goods have been cleared for export. The data must be sent to the carrier in advance of the HGV arriving at the GB port or the driver must have it with them.

 
Safety and security declarations for Spain

 

An entry summary declaration must be lodged for all consignments. The ferry operator must be satisfied that this requirement has been met before loading will be authorised.

For accompanied freight this remains the responsibility of the haulier to make the ENS entry (using EDI only) into the Spanish ICS. This doesn’t rule out the possibility of a private agreement between the ferry operator and the haulier for the ferry operator to assume this role for accompanied freight.

For unaccompanied freight this is done by the ferry operator.

The ferry operator sends the manifest (including references to previous ENS) to the operatives in the Spanish ports. The operatives then send the documents to Aduanas (Spanish customs).

 

Moving goods through Ireland

 

From November 2020 all EU import declarations will need to be submitted to the new Automated Import System (AIS).

 

The Irish Revenue Customs RoRo Service provides 3 functions to facilitate the flow of commercial vehicles into and out of Irish ports. The 3 functions are:

  1. Pre-boarding notification – customs declarations should be made in advance of arrival at the port of departure in the UK. The details of S&S and customs declarations for all goods to be carried on an HGV need to be recorded in the pre-boarding notification (PBN). The PBN is a virtual envelope that links together the details of all the goods being carried on a HGV. The customs authority will provide a single instruction to be followed by the driver on arrival at an Irish port, regardless of the number of consignments on board the vehicle.

  2. Channel look-up – provides information on whether a HGV can directly exit the port or if the goods need to be brought to customs for checking. This information will be made available via the customs RoRo service 30 minutes prior to arrival of the ferry into Ireland and can be accessed by anyone in the supply chain.

  3. Parking self check-in – drivers whose vehicles have been called for a physical inspection will remain in their vehicle and inform Revenue that the goods are available for inspection using this function. When an examination bay becomes available the driver will receive a text message advising where to attend for inspection.

 
Verification and release regimes

 

If issues cannot be resolved goods will be held in temporary storage for a maximum of 90 days.

Holding areas will be in place around ports but space is limited. If goods are seized claims must be made within one month and in writing.

Traders must pay a fee to use border control posts (BCP) and an additional fee may be required if notification is not received prior to arrival.

Goods may be refused entry or destroyed if SPS requirements are not met.

 

After the EU border

 

Once the goods have passed EU customs they can proceed to their destination.

 

Moving goods into the EU under the CTC

 

Before leaving GB

 

If the trader arranges for the goods to move under the CTC the driver must be given either:

  • a transit accompanying document (TAD) from the trader, and be told by the trader that the movement has been released to the transit procedure and that they can proceed to the place of exit from GB
  • a local reference number (LRN) or a TAD that hasn’t been released to the transit procedure, and be told to present the goods and the LRN or TAD to the UK Border Force at a nominated UK office of departure – the goods will then be released, and a TAD will be given to the driver

 

The exporter/agent is responsible for updating the haulage company and driver on the status of the TAD.

S&S requirements will apply in the EU and GB for goods being moved using transit.

From 1 January 2021, combined TSADs cannot be used to meet S&S requirements in GB (UK exit summary declarations). Traders moving goods under transit will need to ensure that the appropriate S&S declarations are made via other means in the EU and in GB where necessary.

As TSADs cannot be used for ENS requirements on transit movements from GB to EU from 1 January 2021 until the roll out of NCTS5 (due 2023), separate TAD entries must be made into the EU Transit System (NCTS), and separate ENS declarations must be made into that member state’s ICS using a commercial EDI platform.

 

At the EU border

 

If the movement is being made under the CTC, the TAD must be presented by the driver to the EU customs authorities in line with the EU’s procedures.

 

After the EU border

 

If the movement is made under the CTC, the driver must present the TAD at an EU office of destination or to an authorised consignee, where the transit procedure will be closed. The goods will then be subject to EU import procedures.

 

Moving goods into the EU under the ATA Convention

 

ATA carnets are international customs documents used for the temporary export or import of goods.

 

Before leaving GB

 

If the trader arranges for the goods to move under the ATA Convention the driver must:

  • obtain the ATA carnet document from the trader
  • take the goods and the ATA carnet to the UK Border Force at a UK office of departure
  • as instructed by the trader, their agent or the logistics company controlling the movement
  • from 1 January 2021, check with the trader that the S&S exit declaration requirements have been met for the movement – relevant S&S requirements must also be met for the country the goods are being moved to

 

At the EU border

 

The driver must present the ATA carnet and ensure it is stamped by the EU customs authorities in line with the EU’s procedures.

 

After the EU border

 

If the movement is made under the ATA Convention, the driver should give the ATA carnet to the recipient of the goods when they are delivered. This is so the ATA carnet is available to return the items to their country of origin, if not transported back by the same outbound haulage company.

 

Moving goods into the EU under the TIR Convention

 

Before leaving GB

 

If the trader arranges for the goods to move under the TIR Convention the vehicle moving the goods must hold an approval certificate of a road vehicle for the transport of goods under customs seal.

 

The haulage company must:

  • give the driver the TIR carnet
  • ensure that arrangements have been made, either by the trader or haulage company to declare the movement to NCTS and have the reference numbers needed to present the goods to the EU customs authorities
  • instruct the driver to take and present the goods and the TIR carnet to the UK Border Force at an UK office of departure
  • from 1 January 2021, check with the trader that the S&S exit declaration requirements have been met for the movement – relevant S&S requirements must also be met for the country the goods are being moved to

 

At the EU border

 

If the movement is made under the TIR Convention, the driver must present the TIR carnet and ensure it is stamped by the EU customs authorities in line with the EU’s procedures.

 

After the EU border

 

The driver must present the TIR carnet and ensure it is stamped by the EU customs authorities either when the goods leave the customs territory of the EU or at an EU office of destination.

Once the vehicle has completed its journey, the driver must return the TIR carnet to their office/manager.

 

Additional requirements for moving specific goods into the EU

 

Moving excise goods out of GB

 

Excise goods are alcohol, tobacco or energy products.

 

If the goods are subject to excise duty, in addition to other commercial documents, the driver must receive from the trader one of the following:

  • a copy of the electronic administrative document (eAD)
  • commercial documents clearly showing the administrative reference code (ARC) for the eAD
  • a paper W8 form for energy products
  • a copy of the customs declaration

 

Moving animal, plant and other controlled products into the EU

 

Haulage companies and drivers who transport animal, plant, and other controlled products, need to be aware of changing rules and know which locations in the EU have BCPs for carrying out checks on these products.

 

The haulage company and driver should not start to move these types of goods until they are certain that the:

  • importer or exporter have checked that the route they intend to take is appropriate
  • border location they intend to use is authorised to move the goods they are carrying
  • trader has given them an Export Health Certificate (EHC) to accompany the goods

 

It is important to note that several EHCs may be needed for a single truckload even if all goods are collected from the same site.

 

Moving animals, animal products, plants, fish and fishery products into the EU

 

Traders moving animals or animal products from the GB to the EU will need to apply in advance for an EHC.

The trader will need to make sure the EHC is signed by an authorised person after the consignment has been inspected. The trader must check that the route the driver takes will allow for the consignment to be checked at the correct BCP at the first EU country reached.

 

A phytosanitary certificate (PC) must accompany consignments of plants and plant products. A trader applies for a PC from the relevant plant health authority:

  • Animal and Plant Health Agency in England and Wales
  • Scottish Government in Scotland
  • Forestry Commission in England, Wales and Scotland for wood, wood products and bark

 

The driver needs to confirm with the trader or haulage company that the EU-based import agent has told the relevant BCP about the arrival of the consignment at least 24 hours before intended arrival.

The driver must carry a physical copy of each EHC or PC for their consignment. The consignments may be checked upon arrival at the EU BCP.

 

Moving marine-caught fish for human consumption into the EU

 

In addition to an EHC, exporters of wild-caught marine fish for human consumption will need to obtain a UK catch certificate for each consignment to the EU.

Exporters will send a copy of the documents to their EU importer but, in some cases, the documents may also be carried by the driver. The haulage company may wish to check that the exporter has obtained a validated UK catch certificate before attempting to export UK caught fish and fishery products to the EU.

 

Moving live animals into the EU

 

To transport live animals into the EU, transporters will nened to apply to an EU member state, where they have representation, for:

  • an EU transporter authorisation
  • a certificate of competence
  • a vehicle approval certificate

 

From 1 January 2021, the EU will not recognise UK-issued versions of these documents.

Transporters are not permitted to hold transporter authorisation or vehicle approval in more than one EU member state. So, they may not be able to apply for these before 1 January 2021.

Transporters can apply for a second certificate of competence from the relevant EU member state before 1 January 2021.

For further information please contact the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA).

 
Journey logs

 

To transport live animals from, or through, England, Scotland or Wales into the EU transporters will need to apply for 2 journey logs:

  • one approved by the EU member state which is the first point of entry into the EU
  • one approved by APHA

 

Moving endangered or protected animal or plant species under CITES

 

Endangered or protected animal or plant species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) can only pass through designated ports. Up-to-date information on these ports and CITES permit and notification requirements are on GOV.UK.

Certain products may fall under both the categories of products of animal origin and CITES items and must therefore comply with the 2 sets of requirements.


Moving goods from the EU to GB

 

Moving goods from Ireland to GB

 

All goods being moved from Ireland to GB will require an export declaration. The Irish exit summary declaration contains the S&S declaration details.

For goods being exported via RoRo a Pre-Boarding Notification needs to be completed prior to arrival at the port of departure in Ireland using Irish Revenue’s RoRo service.

EU export declarations are the responsibility of the exporter and will be submitted using the existing Automated Entry Processing (AEP) system. The AEP system handles the validation, processing, duty accounting and clearance of customs declarations.

Irish Revenue has information about the Customs electronic systems.

 

Moving goods between Ireland and Northern Ireland

 

Drivers moving goods between Ireland and NI will face different customs procedures compared to other UK-EU trade.

 

Moving goods into GB under the Pre-notification procedure

 

Before leaving the EU

 

When collecting the goods, the driver must be given all the relevant customs information or documents and other paperwork. The driver must confirm:

  • that the trader has completed the EU export procedures
  • with the exporter that they’ve met all the UK import requirements

 

From January 2021 for a period of 6 months, there will be different customs requirements for controlled goods and non-controlled goods.

 
Controlled goods

 

From 1 January 2021, customs declarations will be required for all goods on the controlled goods list. Therefore, the haulier must have the MRN when moving controlled goods.

 
Non-controlled goods

 

For non-controlled goods, the importer can make a record in their own commercial records, and then follow this with a supplementary declaration which must be submitted to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) within 6 months of the point of import. Therefore, the haulier must have the trader’s economic operator registration and identification (EORI) number when moving these goods.

 
Safety and security import declarations

 

Exit summary declarations will be required for goods leaving the EU from 1 January 2021. From 1 July 2021, S&S import declarations will be required for imports from the EU into GB. This is the same model used for Rest of World trade.

For goods being imported to GB, carriers have the legal responsibility to provide the UK customs authority with S&S pre-arrival information, by way of entry summary declarations (ENS). For RoRo, a carrier is the ferry operator for unaccompanied goods or the haulier for accompanied goods. The carrier can agree to pass the S&S requirement onto the trader. However, the carrier retains legal responsibility for S&S.

The legal requirement is that the S&S import declaration is complete and accurate to the best of the declarant’s knowledge at the time. However, if details change, a S&S import declaration can be amended up to the point of arrival in the UK.

 

The data required for an ENS declaration includes:

  • consignor
  • consignee
  • a description of the goods
  • routing (country by country)
  • conveyance (e.g. ferry or Eurotunnel details)s
  • time of arrival

 

Goods must have their S&S declarations submitted a specific number of hours in advance of arriving at, or departing from, a UK port. This is to ensure there is sufficient time for Border Force to assess the declarations.

For Eurotunnel, S&S import declarations must be submitted at least 1 hour before arrival (this time is dictated by arrival at Coquelles).

 

For short sea journeys, S&S import declarations must be submitted at least 2 hours before arrival for both containerised and non-containerised imports. Short sea journeys refer to journeys from:

  • the English Channel, or the Atlantic coast of Europe from the point where it meets the English Channel to and including the port of Algeciras
  • Norway
  • Ireland
  • the Faroe Islands
  • Iceland
  • ports on the Baltic Sea and the North Sea

 

An EORI number is required to make S&S declarations.

For imports to GB, the submission of the ENS declaration must be made in the new UK S&S system, ‘S&S GB’. Declarants will need a GB EORI.

For goods moving into Northern Ireland, ENS declarations must be made into the ‘ICS NI’ system. Declarants will need an XI EORI or a valid EU EORI.

There will also be the option to submit declarations through CSP systems/ third party software providers.

Those who have anti-smuggling nets (ASNs) to meet S&S requirements can continue to use them from 1 January 2021.

 

At the EU border

 

The driver must have, for each consignment, evidence of a customs declaration from the traders (in the EU and the UK). This will take the form of:

  • an MRN which may be referred to as UK entry number, or
  • the trader’s EORI number if the UK importer is making the declaration in their own records
  • the EU export declaration MRN

 

At the UK border

 

UK authorities will not routinely stop vehicles on their way into the UK to check that they have the correct import customs documents.

However, on arrival, UK Border Force officers may stop vehicles as they do now to carry out certain customs offences, security and anti-smuggling checks. When they do, they will take the HGV off-line and ask the driver to present the MRN and/or EORI for each consignment, along with other documentation or information as required.

 

Moving goods into GB under the CTC

 

Before leaving the EU

 

If the trader arranges for the goods to move under the CTC the driver must be given either:

  • TAD from the trader, and be told by the trader that the movement has been released to the transit procedure and that they can proceed to the place of exit from the EU member state
  • LRN or a TAD that hasn’t been released to the transit procedure, and be told to present the goods and the LRN or TAD to the EU member state authorities at a nominated EU office of departure – the goods will then be released to and a TAD will be given to the driver

 

The exporter/agent is responsible for updating the haulage company and driver on the status of the TAD.

 

At the EU border

 

If the movement is being made under the CTC, the TAD must be presented by the driver to the EU customs authorities in line with the EU’s procedures.

 

After the UK border

 

For goods moving under the CTC, haulage companies must follow either the paper-based process or the goods vehicle movement service (GVMS) process from 1 January 2021 to complete the transit movement on entry to GB. Which process applies will depend on the location the goods arrive at.

Traders must give the haulage company a TAD MRN for each CTC consignment. The reference number proves that the driver has the right declaration to move goods under transit. The paper TAD must also travel with the goods moving via transit.

 

Haulage companies must use GVMS to link all the TAD references numbers into one GMR for each trailer movement. They can use GVMS in in two ways:

  • a direct link from their own system into the GVMS
  • the online service on GOV.UK – a Government Gateway user ID and password are required for this

 

For each trailer movement, haulage companies or drivers update the GMR with the correct VRN for accompanied movements or TRN for unaccompanied movements. The VRN/TRN can be updated to cater for any changes but must be correct when the GMR is presented to the cross-Channel carrier at the point of departure.

 

Drivers will not be able to board international ferries or Eurotunnel without a complete GMR. They must not proceed to the border:

  • before all the necessary references are added into a GMR
  • if any declaration reference has not been accepted onto the GMR

 

Drivers will need to present the GMR to the cross-Channel carrier on arrival at the point of departure to show that they have the necessary evidence to legally move goods.

Drivers must comply with instructions issued by border authorities to proceed to a specific location for checks, if necessary.

 

Moving goods into GB under the ATA Convention

 

Before leaving the EU

 

If the trader arranges for the goods to move under the ATA Convention, the driver must obtain the ATA carnet document from the trader.

 

At the EU border

 

The driver must present the ATA carnet and ensure it is stamped by the EU customs authorities in line with the EU’s procedures.

 

At the UK border

 

The driver must follow the port’s local procedures for the presentation of a ATA carnet.

 

Moving goods into GB under the TIR Convention

 

Before leaving the EU

 

If the trader arranges for the goods to move under the TIR Convention, the vehicle moving the goods must hold an approval certificate of a road vehicle for the transport of goods under customs seal.

 

The haulage company must:

  • give the driver the TIR carnet
  • ensure that arrangements have been made, either by the trader or haulage company, to declare the movement to the NCTS and have the reference numbers needed to present the goods to the UK customs authorities
  • instruct the driver to take and present the goods and the TIR carnet to the UK Border Force at an UK office of departure

 

At the EU border

 

The driver must present the TIR carnet and ensure it is stamped by the EU customs authorities in line with the EU’s procedures.

 

At the UK border

 

The driver must follow the port’s local procedures for the presentation of an ATA carnet or TIR carnet.

Once the vehicle has completed its journey, the driver must return the TIR carnet to their office/manager.

 

Additional requirements for moving specific goods into GB

 

Moving excise goods into the UK

 

If goods are going to an excise warehouse in the UK, the driver will need to ensure that they hold either a copy of the eAD or commercial documents that clearly state the ARC, before they leave the port. Drivers should obtain these documents from their customer or an intermediary working on their behalf.

However, if the importer has used a simplified customs procedure that allows for the arrival of the goods to be delayed, the creation of the eAD will also be delayed until the goods have arrived. The driver must instead ensure they hold a copy of the pre-lodged customs declaration, which must include details of an excise movement guarantee, before leaving the port.

If goods are still travelling to their delivery address by the end of the next working day following import, the importer (or their agent) should supply the driver at this point with a copy of the eAD or the ARC to formalise the excise movement requirements.

 

Moving live animals and high priority plants and plant products into GB

 

If the driver is carrying high priority plants and plant products, live animals or goods covered by CITES the EU exporter or their agent must make sure that they provide the following documents and/or data to accompany the consignments. The driver needs to present these at check-in at the EU border:

  • the original, wet signed, EHCs if one is needed
  • any CITES documentation required

 

Checks on these products will be carried out at the point of destination until July 2021.

 

Requirements from April and July for moving goods into GB

 

There will be further changes to EU to GB movements in April and July 2021.

From April 2021, there will be additional requirements for products of animal origin (e.g. meat, honey, milk or egg products) and all regulated plants and plant products. These products will require pre-notification and the relevant health documentation, e.g. EHCs. Any physical checks on plants or plant products will continue to be conducted at the point of destination until July 2021.

From July 2021, full import controls and checks will be in place on all products. S&S import declarations will be required for imports from the EU into GB. This will be the same model currently used for Rest of World trade.

Further versions of this handbook will set these new procedures out in detail.


Securing a vehicle when travelling to and from the UK

 

UK, non-EU and EU haulage companies and their drivers must secure vehicles coming into the UK to reduce the risk of becoming a victim of crime.

Drivers crossing the UK-EU border should be aware of the potential threats to vehicles and how they can stop ‘clandestine entrants’. A clandestine entrant is a person who hides in or on a vehicle to avoid going through UK border control.

If a driver does not secure a vehicle, and is found carrying clandestine entrants into the UK and UK controlled zones, the vehicle’s driver, owner or hirer can each be fined up to £2,000 for each person found (also known as a ‘civil penalty’).

The law applies to all arrivals into the UK or UK control zones, including from European ports and via the Eurotunnel.

 

Keeping vehicles secure

 

For haulage companies, an effective system includes:

 

For drivers, an effective system includes:

  • application of security devices (e.g. a padlock, uniquely numbered seals and tilt cord) to secure vehicles after loading
  • checking the security devices and vehicle thoroughly after each stop and before entering the UK
  • recording comprehensive checks on a vehicle security checklist, to show compliance, and have available to present to a Border Force officer

 

Drivers should follow the 10 step guidance on preventing clandestine entrants, and carry this with them throughout their journey.

 

If someone hides in a vehicle 

 

If a driver suspects someone is attempting to enter their vehicle or has entered their vehicle, they should contact local police as soon as it is safe to do so. In the UK call 999 or in the EU call 112 before you enter the port.

 

Checklist of customs documents

 

The customs documents required for each of the four ways to move goods for each port of departure and country of destination:

 

Customs Route / Entry Point Documents required for all destinations From Dover or Eurotunnel To France To the Netherlands To Belgium To Spain To RoI
CTC Transit Accompanying Document with Master Reference Number (MRN)
Export declaration (MRN)
S&SUK EXS / EU ENS
Check an HGV – KAP NCTS French system: Smart Border NCTS Netherlands system: Portbase NCTS Belgian system: RX SeaPort digital system NCTS Spanish system: Teleport 2.0 NCTS
ATA carnet Haulier: ATA carnet
Driver: ATA carnet
S&SUK EXS / EU ENS
Check an HGV – KAP NCTS French system: Smart Border NCTS Netherlands system: Portbase NCTS Belgian system: RX SeaPort digital system NCTS Spanish system: Teleport 2.0 NCTS
Pre-notification Export declaration (MRN)
Transit Master Reference Number (MRN)
S&SUK EXS / EU ENS
Check an HGV – KAP NCTS French system: Smart Border NCTS Netherlands system: Portbase NCTS Belgian system: RX SeaPort digital system NCTS Spanish system: Teleport 2.0 NCTS
TIR TIR carnet
TIR vehicle approval certificate
Export declaration (MRN)
S&SUK EXS / EU ENS
Check an HGV – KAP NCTS (upon arrival in EU) French system: Smart Border NCTS (upon arrival in EU) Netherlands system: Portbase NCTS (upon arrival in EU) RX SeaPort digital NCTS (upon arrival in EU) Spanish system: Teleport 2.0 NCTS (upon arrival in EU)

Published 18 November 2020


From: Department for TransportDriver and Vehicle Standards AgencyDepartment for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs, and HM Revenue & Customs

 

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